Microsoft's Windows 10 servicing calendar: a showcase for contradictions

The latest calendar concept details when different parts of the Windows 10 upgrade process take place, how each successive refresh syncs with other versions, and how disparate parts of the product line like Windows and Office/Microsoft 365 are scheduled.

windows 10 windows microsoft laptop keyboard update  by nirodesign getty
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Windows 10 may be half a decade old, but some things never change. Or if they do, that change comes slowly, in fits, starts, stops and bursts.

Witness the recent "Transform Windows feature updates with a servicing calendar" — a piece by James Bell, a senior product marketing manager in the Microsoft 365 deployment group, posted June 18 on the company's Tech Community website.

Bell used the space to introduce what he called a "Windows servicing calendar" designed to, as he put it, "shift your Windows 10 servicing cadence from a project-based effort to a more fluid process that aligns across the release cycles of Windows, Office and endpoint management tools, such as Configuration Manager."

Essentially, the calendar concept is simply a graphical way to illustrate when different parts of the Windows 10 upgrade process take place, how each successive refresh syncs — or doesn't — with those it follows and precedes, and how disparate parts of Microsoft's product line, notably Windows and Office/Microsoft 365, are also scheduled.

Microsoft's 'Rapid Cadence' servicing calendar Microsoft

Microsoft's "Rapid Cadence" servicing calendar illustrates the original upgrade pace for Windows 10, the model that urged (or required) customers to deploy a refresh every six months.

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